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president left office and fled to russia. white house correspondent jim acosta is with me, and fred polite jen is in moscow, and we will start with jim. first the president made it clear that e he is going to stand with the international community in handling the message with ukraine, and it was a tough message in the 90-minute phone call? >> yes, it was a tough message and we know that the presidents spoke a week and a day ago, but developments have been move sog qui quickly in ukraine with the russian involvement that the president came down hard today in if statement. he said that the united states condemns russia's military intervention in the crimean territory, and i want to put this up on the screen, because this illustrates the statement heref. just how concerned the white house is about what is happening by russia. the united states calls on russia to deescalate tensions by withdrawing the forces back to bases in crimea, and to refrain from interference elsewhere in ukraine. the reason i isolate that particular sentence from the statement, jim, is because it is a couple of things.
to be done next, jim. >> that's it. our coverage conditions with "the situation room." >>> we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. we're following the growing crisis in ukraine where tensions are rapidly escalating and the president of the united states, president obama is about to walk into the white house briefing room to make a major statement. the ukrainian government is accusing russian black sea forces of trying to seize two airports in crimea and cutting off communications between the russian majority region and the rest of ukraine. russian troops also are set to have surrounded the state television facility, some are calling it, and i'm quoting it now, an armed invasion of the country. all of this coming just six days after the ukrainian president, viktor yanukovych, was driven from the capital following deadly demonstrations against this pro-moscow president. let's go to our senior white house correspondent jim askos sta. explain this for us. >> president obama was supposed to be out here 15 minutes ago so he's running late. he was expected to be at
. what are you seeing there now? >> well here in the kentucky area, jim, as u nyou no as we s ice and the sleet and the snow coming into the area. i want to show you what is happening behind me here. the last live shot that we did. live report around 2:00 p.m. eastern. nothing was happening here. a little bit of rain coming down. and now the snow plows doing the work for the rest of the night. 173 pieces of equipment, they are starting to load up the salt to go out and make sure the roads are prepared. the timeline as we know it, i hear it will get rough as the hours go on around 9:00 p.m. we'll start to see the sleet and freezing rain here and then after midnight we'll see a lot of snow. the latest estimate could be five inches or more. so people are preparing as the system comes in. just like the locals. >> that is the way that you say it. >> also, in the cross hairs of the storm. tell me what you are seeing now. >> well, jim, everyone is prepares that they are going to see more. this city has seen five feet of snow. right now you will see it is drizzling here in philadelphia. b
correspondent jim acosta. jim, what are we expecting the president to say here? >> i think the president is going to back up secretary john kerry and other officials, including jay carney earlier this afternoon, that any moves by russia to intervene in the crisis to perhaps invade that territory of crimea would be a grave mistake, in the words of white house officials and according to secretary of state john kerry. one thing that we've been pressing officials all day long, jake, is exactly who those forces are in the crimea area. we're seeing forces with insignias that appear to be blackandover or concealed. it's not clear who is on the ground in crimea. hopefully we'll get updated information from the president as to what that is. jake, make no mistake, this is, again, once again, another confrontation between the president and vladimir putin over what is happening. those events on the ground in the ukraine. >> let's bring in chief national correspondent jim sciutto. i was e-mailing with a senior official who points out that the russians have a base and the question is whether what they
reports. jim reid fought overseas, only to face a battle at home. >> it kind of made me question, you know, myself a little bit, first time in a long time that i had to do that. >> pelley: mark strassman on vets fighting for jobs. and a couple unearth millions in gold coins but will the government let them cash in? bill whitaker reports. >> this is buried treasure, sothing we all fant sights about. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. a few words today from russian president putin seemed to ease world tension overs ukraine, least temporarily, and at least enough for the financial markets to recover. after taking control of ukraine's crimea region, putin said russia has no swengz of fighting the ukrainian people or annexing crimea, but he reserved the right to use force to protect ethnic russians who live in eastern ukraine. in kiev today, the ukrainian captain, secretary of state john kerry honored protesters killed last month. those protesters drove ukraine's pro-moscow president viktor yanukovych from power, and that is wh
can deliver, beginning with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim? >> clearly the administration is getting ready to act. no decision made yet on whether to impose those sanctions or, indeed, which sanctions to impose but they want to have the options ready. and today we heard the president warn that his goal is to isolate russia and make its actions in ukraine very costly. with russian troops now swarming, sovereigning ukrainian territory, preparing likely sanctions against russia. president obama vowing today to make russia's military intervention a costly proposition. >> what we're indicating to the russians is that if, in fact, they continue on the projectory that they are on, we are going to have a negative impact on russia's economy and its status in the world. >> reporter: the possible sanctions include freezing the overseas assets of russian individuals and companies, banning travel for russian leaders and businessmen and at the more extreme end, blocking some russian banks from the international financial system, an enormously costly situation for russ
pentagon correspondent jim administration chef ski is tonight traveling with the chairman of the joint chiefs in afghanistan. he joins us by satellite from bagram air base tonight. jim, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. u.s. and nato leaders were already scheduled to meet tomorrow in brussels to talk about the way ahead in afghanistan. instead, they may now be looking for the way out. joint chiefs chairman general martin dempsey was about to land in afghanistan tonight when he got the word. start preparing to pull all u.s. troops out of afghanistan by the end of the year. >> we are at a point where we have to begin planning for other options. >> reporter: in a phone call today, president obama again urged afghan president hamid karzai to sign a bilateral security agreement that would protect any american troops who remain in afghanistan once the war is officially over at the start of next year. karzai once more refused. white house press secretary jay carney said the president immediately ordered plans for a total u.s. withdrawal. >> this is about, essentially planning fo
with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto here tw latest. jim? >> i think you could say today we saul the full yin and yang of the u.s. policy response to the crisis in crimea. on the other side, secretary of defense chuck hagel demonstrating the u.s. commitment to its nato allies with the deployment of some aircraft and the cancellation-of nato contacts with russia. on the diplomatic side, we saw the opening of a diplomatic path to solving the crisis, the so-called off ramp u.s. officials have mentioned before, still undefined, kerry said, but a start. >> reporter: u.s. and russian diplomats face to face for the first time since the start of the crisis in crimea. secretary of state john kerry said they are now negotiating a diplomatic path to ending it. >> we are committed to working with russia. together with our friends and allies in an effort to provide a way for this entire situation to find the road to deescalation. >> reporter: russian and ukrainian officials, however, did not meet. >> why didn't you meet lavrov today? >> reporter: but as the diplomats talk or don
problems before. back in 2010, there was a race for an open seat in kentucky left vacant by jim bunning's retirement. republican primary that year saw a guy you might recognize, rand paul. but he wasn't big rand paul at the time and he was the underdog going up against kentucky secretary of state trey grayson. grayson was mcconnell's main man. he was said to have hand picked grayson and, of course, publicly endorsed him. then when the election came around, rand paul crushed mcconnell's man, grayson, at the polls. in other words, mitch mcconnell, one of the most powerful republicans in washington, no one argues that, but he couldn't carry trey grayson to victory in a primary in his home state at which point mcconnell may have realized something. he had a self-preservation problem. he went out and hired rabid paul's adviser, named jesse benton to run his campaign. he could at least go out and hire the general. you have mitch mcconnell working with rand paul's guy and suddenly something makes sense here. rand paul, not even up for re-election right now has been going around, you may have s
back then and standing outside the hospital for days and the fight that jim has made for his life. and we see all of the victims, newtown and no matter how many victims there are of gun violence, there's such political resistance to closing loopholes. >> the encouraging thing that the american public is behind us. it's about closing that extraordinary disconnect that exists between what the american public wants and what the elected leaders are doing about it. we take tremendous inspiration from what sara and our predecessors at the brady campaign accomplished. this brady law has been tremendously effective. we've prevented 2.1 million prohibited purchasers from purchasing guns. that's 48 domestic abusers every day that have been prohibited. it's a question of building on that success and looking at what it takes to accomplish that success. it doesn't happen overnight and we can take inspiration from the fight that sara led around the original brady law there. >> i was covering congress at the time, i remember. >> we have to stay the course and it's about making the voice heard an
$1 billion in loan guarantees to ukraine. i'm going to turn to senior white house correspondent jim acosta. so, jim, you have both the secretary of state and president obama expressing a lot of support for ukraine today and the administration seemed to offer president putin perhaps a way out of this crisis. >> that's right, brianna. i think that's what the president and the administration has been saying all along through this, that there are these off-ramps for vladimir putin if he wants to bring in international observers to deal with some of these questions that he has about the safety of ethnic russians, which by the way the administration rejects, then bring in international observers. i will tell you we just came out of what was supposed to be a budget briefing and as you know the president was making those remarks earlier at a budget event. it just shows you how much ukraine and the events are dominating everything right now. i had a chance to ask white house press secretary jay carney about vladimir putin's claim that those are not russian troops in crimea and jay carney sai
this rain and mountain snow so much. >> accu weather meteorologist jim dickey is tracking the pacific storm and another one hitting the northeast. good morning, jim. >> good morning, john and marci. we are tracking snow across the east into new england. through the early morning hours. it is weak but it will travel along the i-95 corridor. boston, south and west, new york city into d.c. just picking up a coating to an inch or show but leaving roadways slick. meanwhile, dealing with brutal cold along the upper midwest. northern plains minus 13, early morning low minneapolis. minus 3 in chicago. many spots above 0 during the day. soaking rain in california. we do need this but too much of a good thing will lead it flooding into the weekend. john and marci, back to you. >> jim dickey, thank you. >>> a spectacular scene from the surface of the sun. a giant solar flare erupted there yesterday. winds over 4 million miles per hour. flares often disrupt communications here on earth. this one was not directed at us. it could still cause auroras near the poles tonight. >> as the health care sign-up d
approved that use of force. on the phone, we have chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. jim, what is this very quick vote signal to you? >> reporter: i think it's the russians slow rolling an invasion of sovereign ukrainian territory, and in direct defiance of repeated public and stern warnings from u.s. officials ranging from secretary kerry, secretary hagel right up to the top, right up to the president. you saw his comments yesterday. it is a sobering development. the fact is, u.s. officials were already telling us yesterday that those masked troops on the ground as of yesterday in and around crimea were russian so now you have a public in effect acknowledgment from the russian government that the president wants to send troops in there, this authorization. i think the other point is that you can see this as an intelligence failure by the u.s. officials had been telling us in the last 48, 72 hours that it was their assessment that the russians would not go in, and here you have it happening. it is not the way they did it in georgia in 2008. you remember when russia sent t
's political and economic crisis? cnn chief national security correspondent jim sciutto explains. >> reporter: there's a lot of questions about russia's interest in the ukraine as well as the west. first a reminder here. ukraine is in europe not a million miles away, the capital few municipal-bond miles away that americans travel to all the time, paris, london, rome. western border key u.s. aslice, slovakia, hungary and romania, poland. ukraine not a member of nato but there's been talk about bringing them in. let's get a better sense of russia's interest there. you look at crimea. on the tip of that peninsula, the sevastopol military headquarters. access to the black sea, mediterranean, atlantic, essential for russia and first place that many of those 6,000 and even more russian troops went when they crossed the border from russia into crimea. sovereign ukrainian territory. let's look inside the country as well because there's a split. western part of the country here liens towards europe, 5% of the population in these parts speak ethnic russian. eastern part 75% here speak russian, ethnic f
, but in the second part of his story on how obamacare could devastate home health care, jim ingle reports democrats are vulnerable because the administration's moves will disproportionately hurt women. >> the administration's cuts to home health care providers, mostly women, was mystifying to politicians of both parties, as well as care givers like dr. david fischer, who makes house calls to treat seniors in their homes, fulfilling one of the promises of obamacare. >> the home health services people are receiving is actually bending the cost curve down. and i think if we focus more on that aspect of our health care system, we'll bend that cost curve even further. >> then why cut funds for home health care workers? his eyes and ears with home bound seeners letting him known when someone falls or gets sick, like yeah vaughn, who had pneumonia, but treated at home, avoiding expensive trips to the er or hospital. >> for the cost of one er visit, you can pay for a year's worth of home physicians. >> that may be why more than half of the senate signed a letter objecting to the cuts after government analy
stories you have heard. jim ingle with that. plus, a timeline on the irs targeting conservatives scandal. stay tuned. for over a decade millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at purplepill.com. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea if you have persistent diarrhea, contact your doctor right away. other serious stomach conditions may exi. avoid if you te clopidogrel. for many, relief is at hand. ask your doctor abouxium. >>> the obama administration has made another change to obamacare, ordering states to pay subsidies first and verify eligibility later. retroactive enrollment idea sparked criticism from republican house energy and commerce subcommittee chairman joe pitts who called that move outrageous. complaints about obamacare from many different people are nothing new. to hear some top democrats tell it, all of those obamacare hor
national security reporter jim sciutto is in washington. could this threat of seizing assets, could that deter the u.s. or eu from less viaing sanctions? >> reporter: it shows how quickly this could spiral into a tit for tat or unupmanship. right now they just target individuals, government officials involved in the decision to send troops into sovereign ukrainian territory. if the russians were to follow through on next step much seizing assets, you know, you have another option for the u.s. which has been discussed and brought up by republican senators, bob corker and others of sanctioning russian entities, meaning state banks, oil companies, energy companies, and that's when you start talking about real money. russia's trade, russia's very economy is dependent on access to the international finance system, its trade with europe. again europe lose as lot and that's why you're seeing opposition from the germans and british and others to more significant sanctions that have already been put on the table by the u.s. >> jim, educate our viewers. how common is it for a country that has
in louisville yesterday. himes.e talking with jim the national finance chairman of the house democrats. we will be talking about the 2014 field coming up in about five minutes or so. have a bit of time left. go to doug in wake forest, north carolina on our line for democrats. good morning. caller: thank you. for decades, the ar american people of wondered why the middle east continues to blow itself up. the interpretation of ancient transcripts. i would like to say that one of you to the people of arizona for helping us find ourselves on the same path. host: let's go to john in florida on our line for independents. caller: i knew this was going to be the first piece when i heard about it yesterday. -- i'mm not hearing is hearing a lot of religion and atheists. i'm not hearing the simple question, is a naturally echo you come down to the issue, nobody wants to talk about homosexuality the act. they talk about two people in love. a nice, romantic, rosy picture. when you talk about the act itself, is that a natural act? is a natural for two men to have sex? baby, i willve a vote for all the h
of a power grab. chief national security correspondent jim sciutto joins us. despite these exercises, troops mobilizing on the border, the obama administration seems confident russia will not be moving troops into ukraine? >> reporter: that's the pentagon's assessment they're not going to act. what's changed in the last 24 hours, because the russians have moved these troops, mobilized these war planes, put them on alert as well, if president putin decided he did want to go in they could poomove so quick u.s. would not have a chance to react to it. that's increased the level of nervousness among administration officials. what would the u.s. do in reaction? we're talking really about only diplomatic means, protests, et cetera. because the supreme nato commander and american general breedlove says europe is not planning certainly any military reaction if the russians were to go in. >> it would be a huge deal if they went in obviously. the question is what would happen inside the ukraine. people there, the country dividing. what about putin? i know he spoke to president obama by phone last week.
things or looking that way now is that often consumers have no way of knowing if jim as are interfering not because there's no way beyond genetically modified ingredients. and this is one tiny solution we can take to get the consumer says the average consumers the information they need to empower them to make the choices that they need for their diets. now though there's been no studies on india mullahs and their safety for chronically ill people do you believe that they're safe for people from elements as well. i can speak from experience and that is hearing from people who are chronically ill to get cia mossad of their diet they see an improved quality of life i think at that rate there is anecdotal but it's people's real life experience as an add something to take into consideration when looking at it and looking at opportunities for this research. tell me at odd hours of this study that ruling came by to say to you as celiac disease. the state that further testing is to be done and we were talking about this what kinds of hats and specific. do we need while we did some independent r
in the ukraine may put more of a strain on the u.s. and russian relations. jim sciutto is joining us with that side of the story. so, in your mind, does the u.s. have any more plans other than just talking loudly at this point? >> well, that's a good question. in those words, there's a lot of meaning. officials delivering very stark warnings to the russians to be careful not to move in. you heard secretary of state john kerry saying yesterday it would be, in his words, a grave mistake in the russians move in. now you have defense secretary chuck hagel who is traveling saying that russia should not make any moves that could easily be misinterpreted. we know they are watching closely. i think we can assume that they are working very much behind the scenes to deliver that message as well. and that shows that they are concerned. what else can they do beyond those concerns, it's a fair question. we don't know. it's hard to say what else they can do. >> what is the biggest concern? >> the biggest concern is that russia moves in. we've seen this story before. you remember in 2008 when russi
. >> nbc chief pentagon correspondent jim mcicklaszewsk is following the crisis. >> u.s. military officials at the pentagon continue to stress there are no viable options, no viable military solutions to this russian/ukrainian crisis. officials continue to stress that they have issued no orders to scramble any military assets, no ships, no planes, no military forces have been put on stand-by. the question is, if you did that, then what would they do? and the big fear is that it could lead to some unintended confrontation with the russian military forces that nobody here wants. instead, they're going to take some small steps. they're talking about suspending or canceling a joint u.s./russian military exercise set for may and cutting off for the time being all military to military consultations and contacts with the russians. you know, the feeling is that the only viable weapons now in the u.s. arsenal are diplomatic and economic sanctions, which the white house has been talking about for some time now. and if there's any piece of good news in any of this, u.s. military says intelligence indi
burning up the phone lines lately. >> the diplomacy continuing full speed ahead. let's hope it works. jim acosta at the white house, thank you. >>> let's go to paris, our foreign affairs reporter elise lavin is there. intense meetings today. the secretary said he'd rather be where all of the action is right now as far as the diplomacy is concerned. did you get the sense that there's any ground for serious optimism right now? >> wolf, i would say cautious optimism. they didn't get that meeting between russian foreign minister lav love and the ukrainian foreign, they've been trying to get together all day kerry met with lavrov. then they sat down together. you had that call between angela merkel in which she's pitching this german/french plan that has some elements that the russians would like. tomorrow secretary kerry will go to rome and meet with foreign minister lavrov again. you have a seedling, if you will, of a diplomatic process. and everyone wants to de-escalate the situation. but i will say, wolf, the state department just sent out a fax sheet and it's called president putin's fict
will mention ambassador jim warlick and ambassador dobbins who did a great job. so we have a great agreement in place. what is the future with that agreement? it will be difficult. afghanistan faces challenges and, all of us are aware of those challenges but i think the odds are very much in favor of success with the bsa in place. will it be in place? the afghan people have spoken. the afghan presidential candidates, a number of whom i spoke to in kabul when i was there are all in favor of signing the bsa i think it's a virtual certainty the bsa will be signed. the issue whether president karzai signs it or not in my view is irrelevant. we need to plan on effectively him not signing it and move forward. i truly hope that any of the costs ambassador dobbins said might occur if there is delay might be effected by the great planning capacity our agencies have. i don't think there is any need for any particular cost as long as we keep our eye on the long game as is the topic of this panel. in turning to this topic of the afghan security forces which i not going to be expert i visited afghanistan
by jim cramer, the street.com is an independent source for stock market analysis. cramer's action alerts plus service is home to his multimillion dollar portfolio. you can learn more at the street.com/nbr. >>> where do we stand? home depot and macy's say spring is the thing to look toward, but one survey on housing says the best of the recovery may be behind us. so is the economy in the winter doldrums or are there real problems ahead? >>> grand canyon, a controversial bill in arizona has big business racheting up the pressure on the state's governor. >>> and being nimble. in the second part of our health care
through congress. republican congressman jim gerlach, for example, sponsored a bill that would create a new path for congress to challenge the president in u.s. district court for, quote, potentially unconstitutional actions. >> i believe it is time for the congress to put in place for a proper of fast track, independent review of those executive actions. >> reporter: democrats on the house judiciary committee saying the president should have flexibility to implement complex programs and challenged the purpose of today's hearing. >> yet, another attempt by the majority to prevent the president's implementation of duly-enacted legislative initiatives that they oppose, such as the affordable care act. >> reporter: but house judiciary committee chairman, republican congressman bob goodlatte contend that the president does not have the constitutional authority, quote, to bypass congress based on his policy prevalences. on the hill today, a a florida orthodontist met with members of congress. he is suing the treasury secretary and irs over the president's decision to delay the obamacare em
was at most of the hearing but left for a bheegt the astronaut jim lovell. in the end senators don't care about people suffering from alsz. 5 million americans suffer from alzheimer's disease, 15 million americans care for them. >>> you can bet more than one political operative will be awaiting a dock drop at the clinton presidential library. more than 4,000 pages of confidential documents will be made public later today and everybody is wondering whether anything juicy will be revealed. the last time those private papers were released they showed hillary clinton called monica lieu withincy a narcissistic looney tune. mark preston is cnn's political director. good morning, mark. >> reporter: good morning. >> any hints for us? >> reporter: it's interesting, we'll see about between 4,000 and 5,000 documents that will be released today. we expect 33,000 documents released over the next month so there's got to be something in there that will cause some interest. i mean this is all during the time when president clinton was president. we know that his wife was one of his top political advisors
to do with the 1990's when she was allied to prime minister who was jim prisoned in the u.s. for about six years and was released a couple of years ago. the allegations are not something new. they've been around for a long time. allegation of corruption are pervasive throughout ukraine's political class. this is not something that she fears. >> this is nothing new. >> no, it's not new. the boxer made money from sports. >> sure, he was a boxer. >> all of the other political forces in one way or another have drown in corruption, all political parties in ukraine don't get money from membershipp dues. they get it from money in offshore zones. that lack of transparency within the political system has been there for a long time. there's a need to separate and break bonds between business and politics and there's certainly a need to fight corruption. no ukrainian leader, none of the four presidents of ukraine have ever had the political will to fight corruption and hencey ukraine is described by transparency international the n.g.o. watchdog on corruption as the most corrupt country in europe
because they're the real deal. >> what has happened to syracuse? >> this has not been jim boeheim's best offensive or defensive team. but for the first 25 games, they operated at an incredibly high level of efficiency. they made plays at a level far above the way they normally played. their numbers aren't that different from last year. last year at the end of the season, georgetown blew them out. they lost games toward the end of the season, they couldn't score. georgetown held them to 35 points in washington, d.c. people were thinking it's over for syracuse. look at the final four. will that happen this year? i don't know. they have jeremy grant out, he's got a back issue, has not played much lately. trevor coony, their terrific shooter, has not been able to find shots. they're not a great offensive team. they're still dangerous but they have to get their mojo back a bit. >> you talked about one of my alma maters, florida gators. they're really good. >> billy donovan is a hall of fame coach. he's not a good coach, he's a great coach. they lost a lot from last year, they've gone to the e
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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